Posts tagged ‘nyc’

November 4, 2010

Paris vs. New York: A Tally of Two Cities

by Matt Forcey

Bagel vs. baguette, subway vs. metro, un petit cafe vs. grande frappuccino.  Graphic designer Vahram Muratyan, having recently moved from Paris to NYC, shares with us his realizations of the quaint little idiosyncratic iconography that most of us overlook, these cosmopolitan ambassadors of salt, pepper and tarragon.

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Paris versus New York: a tally of two cities” is Vahram’s blog, where you will find the rest of his minimalist depictions and contradictions.

November 1, 2010

Play Digital Spy with Covert USB Drives Hidden Around the City

by Matt Forcey

In a scrupulous world, this would be a really cool idea.  As part of his residency with EyeBeam in New York City, Aram Bartholl has created an interesting sociological experiment.  An anonymous, offline, peer-to-peer file sharing network.  On the sly, he has secreted USB flash drives into walls, buildings and street curbs, in publicly accessible spaces

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October 27, 2010

“A” Train Dancers Bust a Move on the NYC Subway

by Matt Forcey

The unexpected and spontaneous can often be a lot more fun than planned and calculated.  This is one of the reasons I love street art.  A chance encounter with a captivating image can be an enthralling experience.  Not limited to spray paint on concrete, street artists and performers share their talents in unexpected venues, as do these dancers on a New York City subway car.

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September 21, 2010

KanyeNewYorkerTweets

by Matt Forcey

A match made in the cloud.  Cartoons from the iconic New Yorker magazine, mashed up with tweets from hip hop artist Kanye West’s Twitter page.

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September 16, 2010

Trespass: A History of Uncommissioned Urban Art

by Matt Forcey

Wooster Collective founders edit a new book of the most astounding outlaw street art

Books on street art are as common as taggers who think they’re going to be the next Banksy. So when we heard the elusive artist himself wrote the intro to “Trespass,” a book billing itself as a “A History of Uncommissioned Urban Art,” we decided to take a closer look.

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September 15, 2010

Brooklyn Street Art, “Mutual Discrepancy” by GAIA & NohJColey

by Matt Forcey

Straight outta Brooklyn, brooklynstreetart.com tracks the new creative spirit that runs in the streets, the artist studios, and galleries of New York and beyond. New hybrids, new techniques, and new mediums are expanding the definition of public art, street art, graffiti, and urban art; each vying for the attention of passers-by.

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September 15, 2010

Jean-Michel Basquiat: The Radiant Child

by Matt Forcey

By Michael Kurcfeld

Today we take it for granted when seeing graffiti art in a posh gallery, but arguably the first artist to channel the urban street frequencies of his time and get it onto the “white walls with white people with white wine” was Jean-Michel Basquiat.

In 1988 this singularly gifted artist, who had leapt to fame in Warhol’s New York, died of a drug overdose at the age of 27. Filmmaker Tamra Davis took all of the footage she had shot of her good friend, including a never-seen interview and B-roll of him working in his studio, and put it in away in a drawer. 20 years later, she decided it was not hers to hide anymore and made it the core of a superb documentary, Jean Michel Basquiat: The Radiant Child.

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September 15, 2010

America In The Twilight Zone: I Can’t Believe We Are Even Discussing This

by Matt Forcey

Democrat, Republican, Libertarian, put down your labels for a moment and see if you can think about this as an American and a member of the human race.  The “Ground Zero Mosque” story has been brewing for a good month or so now.   Regardless of how this turns out, it’s one more log to toss on the signal fire, stoked by our political right, that reminds the rest of the world that this is America, the land of Liberty and Freedom for All… as long as you look the right way (pun intended) and believe in the same things we do. 

I wish this was an isolated incident, but unfortunately it’s just the highest profile, due to its location.  This same story has been repeated all across the country

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September 6, 2010

Hurry Up and Wait: Photographers-Turned-Truckers Peek into America’s Trucking Subculture

by Matt Forcey

In summer 2008, at the height of the U.S. financial crisis, husband-and-wife photographers James Tribble and Tracey Mancenido packed up their NYC apartment and hit the road to document one of the more obscure necessities of American consumerism first-hand. Armed with little more than a commercial license, tips from Tribble’s truck driver dad and a few large-format cameras, the dynamic artists embarked on their new career as truckers.

The resulting body of work, a series of tenderly contemplative portraits and still-lifes, opens 9 September 2010 at NYC’s Sasha Wolf Gallery, revealing a rarely-seen side of the greasy culture responsible for supplying the country with everything from scrap metal to Toy Story 3 dolls.

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To learn more, their blog on the project is full of updates and insights they posted while on the road. For those in NYC, see the haunting pictures in person at the Sasha Wolf gallery before the show closes 23 October 2010. 

Via Cool Hunting

September 5, 2010

All Aboard Manhattan’s High Line

by Matt Forcey

The High Line, an elevated railroad track running up the West Side of Manhattan, was built in the 1930s and abandoned by 1980.  It thrived for years as a figment of people’s romantic imagination — a wild meadow threaded with rusty rails 30 feet above the street — that was visited primarily by adventuresome truants and graffiti artists. Last summer, the High Line, redesigned to look like a wild meadow threaded with a concrete path and some carefully relocated rusty rails, finally opened as a park — and it does not disappoint.

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